Haskins Laboratories

The Science of the Spoken and Written Word

Vincent Gracco, Ph.D., Vice President of Scientific Operations, Senior Scientist

Vincent Gracco's picture
Address: 
300 George Street, Suite 900, New Haven, CT 06511-6624
203.865.6163, x313
Fax number: 
203.865.8963

Affiliations

Senior Scientist, Haskins Laboratories
Professor, McGill University

Education

PhD Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison
BA & MA Speech Pathology, San Diego State University

Research interests

My research focuses on the neuroscience of human communication using multiple neuroimaging modalities and physiological techniques. Current research areas focus on the development and mechanisms of sensorimotor control for spoken language, sensorimotor dysfunctions associated with stuttering and other speech motor disorders, neuroplasticity and sensorimotor learning, bilingualism and the relationship between language and music.

Representative Publications

Ito T, Ostry DJ, Gracco, VL (2015). Somatosensory Event-related Potentials from Orofacial Skin Stretch Stimulation. J. Vis. Exp. (106), e53621, doi:10.3791/53621.
 
Beal D, Lerch J Cameron B, Henderson R, Gracco VL, De Nil LF (2015). The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca’s area is abnormal in people who stutter. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9, 89-94. PMCID: PMC4347452.
 
Mollaei F, Shiller DM, Baum SR, Gracco VL (2016). Sensorimotor control of vocal pitch and formant trajectories in Parkinson¹s disease. Brain Research, 1646, 269-277.
 
Berken JA, Gracco VL, Klein D (2016). Early bilingualism, language attainment, and brain development. Neuropsychologia. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.08.031
 
van den Bundt M, Francisco AA, Groen MA, Ito T, Gracco VL, Pugh KR, Verhoeven L (2017). Increased response to altered auditory feedback in dyslexia: A weaker sensorimotor magnet implied in the phonological deficit. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 60(3), 654-667. 
 
van de Vorst R, Gracco VL (2017). Atypical non-verbal sensorimotor synchronization in adults who stutter may be modulated by auditory feedback. J Fluency Dis. 53, 14-25.
 

McGill University webpage