Haskins Laboratories

The Science of the Spoken and Written Word

Paul Gribble, Ph.D.

Paul Gribble's picture
Address: 
300 George Street, Suite 900, New Haven, CT 06511-6624
1.519.661.2111, x82237

Affiliations

Senior Scientist
Haskins Laboratories

Professor
Brain and Mind Institute, Dept. Psychology
Dept. Physiology & Pharmacology
Western University Canada

Contact Information

Paul Gribble
The Brain and Mind Institute
Natural Sciences Centre, Rm 120
Department of Psychology
Western University
London, Ontario N6A 5B7
CANADA

Education

1999      PhD         McGill University

1995      MSc         McGill University

1993      BSc          Queen’s University

Research Interest

My research involves basic scientific studies of sensory and motor systems in humans. The primary goal is to increase our understanding of the organization of the human nervous system. I study how the brain controls voluntary movement, and how neuroplasticity in sensory and motor brain areas supports motor skill learning. I conduct empirical studies using neurophysiological techniques such as fMRI, TMS, EEG and EMG, and behavioral approaches using robotic devices to create artificial mechanical environments. I also conduct theoretical studies using computational models and computer simulations to test hypotheses about motor control, neuroplasticity and motor learning.

Representative Publications

McGregor HR, Gribble PL (2015) Changes in Visual and Sensory-Motor Resting-State Functional Connectivity Support Motor Learning by Observing. J. Neurophysiol. 114:677-88

Wong JD, Wilson ET, Kistemaker DA, Gribble PL (2014) Bimanual proprioception: are two hands better than one? J. Neurophysiol. 111:1362-8

Wong J, Wilson ET, Gribble PL (2011) Spatially Selective Enhancement of Proprioceptive Acuity Following Motor Learning. J. Neurophysiol. 105: 2512-21

Kistemaker DA, Wong JD, Gribble PL (2010) The Central Nervous System does not minimize energy cost in arm movements. J. Neurophysiol., 104, 2985-94

Ostry DJ, Darainy M, Mattar AA, Wong J, Gribble PL (2010) Somatosensory plasticity and motor learning. J. Neurosci. 30(15): 5384-93

Supported Grant

NIH Grant RO1 HD-075740 - Training-Induced Plasticity in Human Motor and Sensory Systems (D. Ostry, PI/A196

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