Haskins Laboratories

The Science of the Spoken and Written Word

Lawrence Brancazio, Ph.D.

Lawrence Brancazio's picture
Address: 
300 George Street, Suite 900, New Haven, CT 06511-6624
203-865-6163
Fax number: 
203-865-8963

brancazioL1@SouthernCT.edu

Education

B.A. Psychology, University of Pennsylvania (1992)
Ph.D., Experimental Psychology, University of Connecticut (1998)

Professio​nal Experience

2014 – present Chairperson, Psychology Department, Southern Connecticut State University
2014 – present Professor, Southern Connecticut State University, Psychology
2006 – 2014 Associate Professor, Southern Connecticut State University, Psychology
2001 – 2006 Assistant Professor, Southern Connecticut State University,  Psychology
2002 – present Senior Scientist, Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
1998 - 2001 Postdoctoral Research Associate, Northeastern University, Dept. of Psychology

External Website

Current grant support

Investigator, A-204;  NIH Grant DC-013864 - Neurobiological Signatures of Perception and Imitation of AV Speech in Children with ASD (Julia Irwin, PI)

Investigator, A-40: NIH Grant PO1 HD-01994 - Nature and Acquisition of the Speech Code and Reading (Jay Rueckl, PI)

Research Summary

My research focus is on speech perception, with a particular focus on audiovisual perception and the detection of gestural information. Recent projects include:

  • Explorations of the McGurk effect
  • Examining the time-course of speech perception using cursor movements (“mousetracking”)
  • Audiovisual speech perception and eye-gaze patterns during speech perception in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) [with Julia Irwin]
  • Individual differences in audiovisual speech perception and their relationship with individual differences in lipreading, reading skill, attention, and working memory [with Dina Moore, SCSU]
  • Training individuals to distinguish non-native speech sounds (with Emily Myers, Jim Magnuson, Navin Viswanathan, and Julia Irwin)

Publications

Irwin, J.R. & Brancazio, L. (2014). Seeing to hear? Patterns of gaze to speaking faces in children with autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers, Language Sciences. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00397.

Katz, L., Brancazio, L., Irwin, J., Katz, S., Magnuson, J., & Whalen, D. (2012). What lexical decision and naming tell us about reading. Reading and Writing, 25, 1259-1282.

Irwin, J.R., Tornatore, L., Brancazio, L. & Whalen, D.H. (2011). Can children with autism spectrum disorders “hear” a speaking face? Child Development, 82, 1397–1403.

Brancazio, L., & Miller, J. L. (2005). Use of visual information in speech perception: Evidence for a visual rate effect in McGurk and non-McGurk responses. Perception& Psychophysics, 67, 759-769.

Brancazio, L. (2004). Lexical influences in audiovisual speech perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 30, 445-463.